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The Dalek Chronicles

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2006-05-06 22:16:46 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular sub-arc.

So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular sub-arc.

So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the sub-arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that sub-arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story in that issue is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of the sub-arc, "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

2006-05-06 22:15:00 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment.

So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular sub-arc.

So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

2006-05-06 22:12:31 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment.

So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

2006-05-06 22:11:43 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles".

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The arc has gone by two different names in reprinted form. In some parts (and on some covers) of Doctor Who Magazine, it was called "The Dalek Tapes". But when Marvel finally collected all 104 parts into a single trade, the name reverted firmly to "The Dalek Chronicles", as was the author's original intent. This is the name that has generally stuck amongst those in-the-know, and it is the name we use here.In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles". Where more than one part is printed in a single issue, as with the run in the earliest issues of Doctor Who Magazine, and in Doctor Who (1984), and Doctor Who Classic Comics, the segment in a particular issue will be called by the name of the arc, along with notation as to whether it's a continuation or conclusion of that arc (if applicable). Thus, issue #33 of Doctor Who Magazine (then called Doctor Who Weekly), contains all three parts of "Genesis of Evil", so the story is called, simply, "Genesis of Evil". Issue #38 contains the middle bit of "The Penta Ray Factor", so it's called "The Penta Ray Factor (continued)". It is hoped that this nomenclature will distinguish between a "part" in the many reprints and a "part" in the original printing.

2006-05-05 21:52:08 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles".

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles".

2006-05-05 21:51:42 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

In this database, the part number available in a particular issue will always be relative to its original part number in the whole of "The Dalek Chronicles", and not to its part number in a particular segment. So, for instance, Doctor Who Magazine #183 includes what could be considered Part 1 of "The Daleks: Power Play", but is instead referred to as Part 4 of "The Dalek Chronicles".

2006-05-05 20:54:42 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures. Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

2006-05-05 20:52:12 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.

The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures. Parts 1-24 (or, "Genesis of Evil", "Power Play", "Duel of the Daleks", and "The Amaryll Challenge") are currently available online.

2006-05-05 20:37:45 DarthSkeptical Name The Daleks The Dalek Chronicles
2006-05-05 20:37:45 DarthSkeptical Notes The name for the arc which comprises all the constituent stories written by David Whitaker. In all, it contains 104 parts, spread out over as many issues of TV Century 21. They were subsequently reprinted in a variety of places episodically, as well as being collected into a single volume.

Generally the arc concerned itself with tales of the very earliest days of Dalek history. They were subsequently contradicted by the televised program, "Genesis of the Daleks". At the time, this caused a bit of a furor in fandom, which had become attached to the Whitaker version of the Daleks' origins—one which, notably, did not include Davros. Now, however, these comics have largely been forgotten, although some fans have, in the 21st century, used them as a basis for all-CGI animated adventures.



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