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Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane (1958) #89

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2014-04-27 11:14:30 mikebo Removed Character Pennyworth (DC)(Post Crisis), Alfred Thaddeus Crane
2014-04-27 11:14:30 mikebo Added Character Pennyworth (DC)(Earth-1 - Pre Crisis), Alfred
2010-10-01 10:42:02 swamptours Removed Character Maha Yogi
2010-10-01 10:41:49 swamptours Added Character Maha Yogi
2010-08-03 21:26:21 ccl080673 Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the caliber of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Professor Nichols, Aunt Harriet and Wonder Woman cameos.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the caliber of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Lucy Lane, Alfred Pennyworth, Professor Nichols, Aunt Harriet and Wonder Woman cameos.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2010-08-03 21:25:25 ccl080673 Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the caliber of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the caliber of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Professor Nichols, Aunt Harriet and Wonder Woman cameos.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2010-08-03 21:18:40 ccl080673 Added Character Pennyworth (DC)(Post Crisis), Alfred Thaddeus Crane
2010-08-03 21:18:40 ccl080673 Added Character Cooper (Earth-1), Aunt Harriet
2010-08-03 21:18:40 ccl080673 Added Character Daye (Earth-1), Kaye
2010-08-03 21:18:40 ccl080673 Added Character Nichols, Carter
2010-08-03 21:13:30 ccl080673 Added Character Superman (DC)(Earth-1 - Pre Crisis)
2010-08-03 21:13:30 ccl080673 Added Character Batman (DC)(Earth-1 - Pre Crisis)
2010-08-03 21:13:30 ccl080673 Added Character Robin (01 - Dick Grayson, E-1 & Post-Crisis)
2010-08-03 21:13:30 ccl080673 Added Character Wonder Woman (DC)(Earth-1 - Pre Crisis)(01- Diana)
2010-08-03 21:13:30 ccl080673 Added Character Lane (Earth-1), Lucy
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Added Creator Leo Dorfman
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Added Creator Curt Douglas Swan
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Added Creator Mike Esposito - 'Espo'
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Added Creator (Unknown Creator)
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Added Creator (Unknown Creator)
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Name The Bride Of Batman!
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Tagline Featuring Lois As "The Bride Of Batman!"
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Pagecount 36 32
2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the calibre of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the caliber of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2010-08-03 21:09:03 ccl080673 Letter Column Letters to Lois and Lana
2005-12-30 17:10:06 DarthSkeptical Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it was awfully tough for artists even of the calibre of Infantino and Adams to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2005-12-30 17:08:04 DarthSkeptical Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to a different episode on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were aware of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they knew this one, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to "Mxyzpixilated" on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were influenced to make their Mr. Mxyzptlk turn Lois into a horse in part because of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they were influenced by this issue, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2005-12-30 17:04:51 DarthSkeptical Notes The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear, however, how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff. However, remarks on the commentary to a different episode on the Season 2 DVDs make it perfectly clear they were aware of issue #92, so it's not too much of a stretch to speculate they knew this one, too.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2005-12-30 16:52:02 DarthSkeptical Notes Though this issue is comprised of what we'd today call Elseworlds stories, the basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear, however, how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

The basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear, however, how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2005-12-30 16:51:05 DarthSkeptical Notes Though this issue is comprised of what we'd today call Elseworlds stories, the basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. Though not the first such instance of a Batman/Lois liaison, what's significant about this issue is a notion that was a part of the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline from season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. As seen here on the cover, and in obviously greater detail inside, we see that Lois gives up on Superman and goes for the un-costumed Bruce Wayne. It's an early--if not unprecedented--hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. This is one of the few issues in which the cover depicts any kind of feeling of loss or emotional vulnerability on the part of Superman.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

Though this issue is comprised of what we'd today call Elseworlds stories, the basic notion of Bruce Wayne as rival suitor is herein explored. A Batman/Lois liaison had been explored before, of course, but this is an early, rare example of the idea of Lois falling in love with someone she believed to be perfectly human. The basic narrative of the book would later be incorporated into the Emmy-award-winning "World's Finest" storyline in season 2 of Bruce Timm's Superman animated series. (It is not clear, however, how directly this issue inspired the show's writing staff.)

Though an Elseworlds story, it's still a rare pre-modern hint that in order to get Superman, she's going to have to fall in love with Clark Kent. Note, too, that the the cover theme of Superman--or more accurately, Clark-as-Superman--expressing emotional vulnerability or a sense of "loss of Lois" is exceptionally unusual for this title. This title had often shown Lois pursued by this meta-human or that, but it took an ordinary mortal to really evoke some Super-angst.

We also see that, just as in the animated series, it's awfully tough for artists to visually differentiate between Superman and Bruce Wayne.

Infantino provides cover pencils; Adams, the inks.

2005-12-30 16:37:44 DarthSkeptical Added Cover Added cover (thumbnail)
2005-12-30 16:37:44 DarthSkeptical Added Cover Added cover (large)

View this issue

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