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Millie the Model

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2006-10-02 19:17:12 DarthSkeptical Notes

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. She penciled and inked issue #1 of Millie the Model in the winter of 1945. Mike Sekowsky took on the bulk of the artistic chores immediately thereafter, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

In the Marvel Universe
During the first 20 years of her existence, Millie was quite clearly in a different universe than the the Marvel superheroes. However, with the wedding of Sue and Reed Richards in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), her name came up in casual conversation of some of the wedding guests. Though not actually seen in this issue, the dialogue established her as a famous-enough model to have earned a place at the high-profile wedding. When the wedding was retold by Alex Ross in Marvels she actually was seen at that wedding.

Though she did not participate heavily in the events of the Marvel Universe following the Storm-Reed wedding, she has been seen in Defenders, Dazzler, and The Sensational She-Hulk, mostly as an older woman running a modeling agency. In the mid 1980s, she was a recurring character in the Star Comics children's series, Misty, which centered on the adventures of her niece.

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. She penciled and inked issue #1 of Millie the Model in the winter of 1945. Mike Sekowsky took on the bulk of the artistic chores immediately thereafter, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

In the Marvel Universe
During the first 20 years of her existence, Millie was quite clearly in a different universe than the the Marvel superheroes. However, with the wedding of Sue and Reed Richards in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), her name came up in casual conversation of some of the wedding guests. Though not actually seen in this issue, the dialogue established her as a famous-enough model to have earned a place at the high-profile wedding. When the wedding was retold by Alex Ross in Marvels, her presence at the wedding was reconfirmed.

Though she did not participate heavily in the events of the Marvel Universe following the Storm-Reed wedding, she has been seen in Defenders, Dazzler, and The Sensational She-Hulk, mostly as an older woman running a modeling agency. In the mid 1980s, she was a recurring character in the Star Comics children's series, Misty, which centered on the adventures of her niece.

2006-10-02 19:06:22 DarthSkeptical Notes

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. She penciled and inked issue #1 of Millie the Model in the winter of 1945. Mike Sekowsky took on the bulk of the artistic chores immediately thereafter, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

In the Marvel Universe
During the first 20 years of her existence, Millie was quite clearly in a different universe than the the Marvel superheroes. However, with the wedding of Sue and Reed Richards in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), her name came up in casual conversation of some of the wedding guests. When the wedding was retold by Alex Ross in Marvels she actually was seen at that wedding. Though she did not participate heavily in the events of the Marvel Universe following the Storm-Reed wedding, she has been seen in Defenders, Dazzler, and The Sensational She-Hulk, mostly as an older woman running a modeling agency. In the mid 1980s, she was a recurring character in the Star Comics children's series, Misty, which centered on the adventures of her niece.

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. She penciled and inked issue #1 of Millie the Model in the winter of 1945. Mike Sekowsky took on the bulk of the artistic chores immediately thereafter, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

In the Marvel Universe
During the first 20 years of her existence, Millie was quite clearly in a different universe than the the Marvel superheroes. However, with the wedding of Sue and Reed Richards in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), her name came up in casual conversation of some of the wedding guests. Though not actually seen in this issue, the dialogue established her as a famous-enough model to have earned a place at the high-profile wedding. When the wedding was retold by Alex Ross in Marvels she actually was seen at that wedding.

Though she did not participate heavily in the events of the Marvel Universe following the Storm-Reed wedding, she has been seen in Defenders, Dazzler, and The Sensational She-Hulk, mostly as an older woman running a modeling agency. In the mid 1980s, she was a recurring character in the Star Comics children's series, Misty, which centered on the adventures of her niece.

2006-10-02 19:04:30 DarthSkeptical Notes Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. Mike Sekowsky took on early artistic chores, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. She penciled and inked issue #1 of Millie the Model in the winter of 1945. Mike Sekowsky took on the bulk of the artistic chores immediately thereafter, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

In the Marvel Universe
During the first 20 years of her existence, Millie was quite clearly in a different universe than the the Marvel superheroes. However, with the wedding of Sue and Reed Richards in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), her name came up in casual conversation of some of the wedding guests. When the wedding was retold by Alex Ross in Marvels she actually was seen at that wedding. Though she did not participate heavily in the events of the Marvel Universe following the Storm-Reed wedding, she has been seen in Defenders, Dazzler, and The Sensational She-Hulk, mostly as an older woman running a modeling agency. In the mid 1980s, she was a recurring character in the Star Comics children's series, Misty, which centered on the adventures of her niece.

2006-10-02 18:52:49 DarthSkeptical Notes The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character, and that Dan DeCarlo (who would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics, notably creating Josie and the Pussycats) finalized her visual design.

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical inovlvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

Created by . . .
The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character. Mike Sekowsky took on early artistic chores, but it was Dan DeCarlo's 1949-59 run that truly cemented her visual design. (DeCarlo would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics—notably creating Josie and the Pussycats—so it is not surprising that the Atomic Age Millie, and her boyfriend Flicker, strongly resemble Archie and Veronica.)

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical involvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

2006-10-02 18:45:02 DarthSkeptical Notes The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character, and that Dan DeCarlo (who would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics, notably creating Josie and the Pussycats) finalized her visual design. What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical inovlvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics. The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character, and that Dan DeCarlo (who would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics, notably creating Josie and the Pussycats) finalized her visual design.

What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical inovlvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

2006-10-02 18:44:45 DarthSkeptical Notes The issue of who, exactly, created Millie is slightly unknown. Undisputed is the fact that Ruth Atkinson played a heavy role in developing her essential character, and that Dan DeCarlo (who would later go on to heavily influence Archie Comics, notably creating Josie and the Pussycats) finalized her visual design. What's a little less clear is Stan Lee's hand in creating her. Some describe his involvement as a full collaboration between he and Atkinson. Others say his was more of a technical inovlvement, since he was, at the time, editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.
2006-09-23 17:43:23 ferroboy New Character


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